Human dignity is a human right.

what is it like to look up at a plane never having been in one

poverty is not a state of mind

She was looking for a better job and wishing for longer hours and higher pay, but she nonetheless told me that poor people are lazy and don’t want to work.
They believed that hard work would guarantee they would get ahead, even as most of them worked very hard but stayed poor. They blamed themselves for not having achieved more in life.

Overheard on Myrtle Avenue

Two black kids waiting for the bus on Myrtle. They appear not quite close enough to be siblings, but share some familial-like affection for one another.

An older boy, maybe 15. Long hair in braids. Reflective look in his eye.
A younger girl, maybe 11. Looking up to him. Listening intently. 

As I pass in a car, with the windows rolled down, I gather just enough of the conversation for it to land.

"Did you know that 1 in 3 black men will go to prison."
He looks to see how she's taking in this betrayal. 
"1 in 3".
He repeats. 

 

IMG_5427.JPG

on satire

// in response to this work's criticism of satire (which btw, one of the best examples of multi-media, internet storytelling i've seen)

I think it's useful. 

- As a device that introduces unpalatable topics in an engaging way
- As a general mindset / attitude that values and propagates close observation and dissent, characteristics that I think are critical to members of society. It encourages a certain wakefulness.

Agreed that on important issues, the buck can't stop there. Action is required. But I think satire can be a gateway to serious declarations and action. Think about the soapbox Jon Stewart built for himself. 

I think criticism becomes dangerous and futile if it seeps into your outlook so much that you are no longer motivated to overcome difficulty. Criticism is mistaken as an action in itself and can make one feel comfortable, superior and resolved in one's pessimism.

But i think that is the difference between cynicism and satire.

Not to mention a world without satire sounds hella boring.

I am not the system and the system is not here. I am.

it's a heart-warming, hopeful occurrence, when an employee breaks preset rules in favor of common sense. when a human asserts their own judgement, assesses a situation, and realizes no, in this instance the systemic rules are wrong. i should disobey them. and I will. 

That happened today. Admittedly, a trivial example. But still, a victory I will relish in. The men delivering my patio furniture decided that despite the order on the slip for “Front Door Drop-Off”, they would instead, seeing me, helpless with my broken leg, carry the furniture all the way to the back patio.

INDEPENDENT THINKING HEROS.

Even amongst the delivery guys. The younger of the two, the less experienced, the less “institutionalized”, advocated without hesitation, “she has a broken leg, she literally can't walk!”

Often in this situation the response is, “I'm sorry, I can’t. We’re on a schedule. We have so many other deliveries to do. If you wanted in house delivery, you should have requested 'in-house delivery'". And I get that. I understand the fear of your boss, losing your job. But we need to resist in these little ways. Breaking system rules must be more common in our culture.

People are concerned about AI taking over.

We already have headless-systems that we mostly are scarily obedient to, and in turn, end up directing far too much of our lives, and sadly, our interactions with each other.

But episodes such as this one today, make me hopeful.